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What are the symptoms of Covid-19?

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Fever or chills

  • Cough

  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

  • Fatigue

  • Muscle or body aches

  • Headache

  • New loss of taste or smell

  • Sore throat

  • Congestion or runny nose

  • Nausea or vomiting

  • Diarrhea

 

How does the virus spread?

The virus that causes COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Spread is more likely when people are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).

 

Are children more at risk?

Information about COVID-19 in children is somewhat limited, but the information that is available suggests that children with confirmed COVID-19 generally had mild symptoms. Person-to-person spread from or to children, as among adults, is thought to occur mainly via respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks.  Recent studies indicate that people who are infected but do not have symptoms likely also play a role in the spread of COVID-19.

However, a small percentage of children have been reported to have more severe illness. Despite lower risk of serious illness, children with COVID-19-like symptoms should avoid contact with older adults and people of any age who may be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.


 

How can I protect my child from developing Covid-19?

You can encourage your child to help stop the spread of COVID-19 by teaching them to do the same things everyone should do to stay healthy.

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.

  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue and throw the tissue in the trash.

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

  • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.

  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects, like tables, countertops, light switches, doorknobs, and cabinet handles).

Why are masks important?

Wear cloth face coverings in public settings when around people not living in your household and particularly where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain, such as grocery stores, pharmacies, and gas stations. Cloth face coverings may slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others.

COVID-19 can be spread by people who do not have symptoms and do not know that they are infected. That’s why it’s important for everyone to practice social distancing (staying at least 6 feet away from other people) and wear cloth face coverings in public settings. Cloth face coverings provide an extra layer to help prevent the respiratory droplets from traveling in the air and onto other people.

The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators.  Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.

 

What are some of the things Hazlet Township is doing to help to maintain my family's safety?

  • Following all current CDC and Dept of Health recommendations while aligning with the NJ Department of Educations “Road Back” guidelines.

  • Face coverings will be mandatory for all Staff

  • Face coverings will be mandatory for all students when social distancing can not be maintained (unless it will inhibit the students health). 

  • Student and staff health screenings prior to school.

  • Minimizing visitors to buildings.

  • Maximizing distancing and guiding student flow by using measures such as one-way hallways, tape on floors and signage (individual schools will vary).

  • Appropriate staff will be trained in contact tracing techniques to be utilized in the event of a suspected exposure.

  • Increasing education on key essential tools to protect our school community such as: hand hygiene, face coverings, staying home when sick, and respiratory etiquette.

  • Isolation areas will be available if needed and all students or staff that present with Covid-19 related symptoms.  Individuals will be sent home immediately and assisted in proper isolation/quarantine protocols, assistance in seeking medical attention, and guidelines for re-admittance.

  • Improved Ventilation systems and air filtering.

  • Increased routine cleaning of frequently touched surfaces and high traffic areas (such as restrooms)

Tips for talking to children

  • Remain calm. Remember that children will react to both what you say and how you say it. They will pick up cues from the conversations you have with them and with others.

  • Reassure children that they are safe. Let them know it is okay if they feel upset. Share with them how you deal with your own stress so that they can learn how to cope from you.

  • Make yourself available to listen and to talk. Let children know they can come to you when they have questions.

  • Avoid language that might blame others and lead to stigma.

  • Pay attention to what children see or hear on television, radio, or online. Consider reducing the amount of screen time focused on COVID-19. Too much information on one topic can lead to anxiety.

  • Provide information that is truthful and appropriate for the age and developmental level of the child. Talk to children about how some stories on COVID-19 on the Internet and social media may be based on rumors and inaccurate information. Children may misinterpret what they hear and can be frightened about something they do not understand.

  • Teach children everyday actions to reduce the spread of germs. Remind children to wash their hands frequently and stay away from people who are coughing or sneezing or sick. Also, remind them to cough or sneeze into a tissue or their elbow, then throw the tissue into the trash.

  • If school is open, discuss any new actions that may be taken at school to help protect children and school staff.

 

Helpful links

What you need to know-CDC https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/2019-ncov-factsheet.pdf

 

NJ dept of health https://www.nj.gov/health/

 

Monmouth County health Dept https://www.co.monmouth.nj.us/page.aspx?ID=1932

 

Guidance for schools- CDC https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/schools-childcare/guidance-for-schools.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fcoronavirus%2F2019-ncov%2Fspecific-groups%2Fguidance-for-schools.html

 

The Road Back-Restart and Recovery Plan for Education- https://www.nj.gov/education/reopening/NJDOETheRoadBack.pdf